Tag: energetics

Wild cats need to count calories, too

Science coverage or our – wait for it – article in Science.  With all the “coverage”, does any read the original article?

A sleek cheetah races with legs outstretched, leaping with a great burst of energy to bring down a fast-moving antelope. That iconic image of this African wild cat needs a footnote. The world’s fastest runner actually spends very little time and energy at full speed, a new study finds. Instead, its most strenuous activity is simply walking around in the hot sun, looking for potential prey. It’s much the same story for the cheetah’s American cousin, the puma, which spends more than twice as much energy locating prey than researchers had predicted.

Read the full coverage here and here.

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Cheetahs and pumas may have hunting strategies down to a science

Another nice article on our recent Science paper.  This one in the LA Times.

It’s not easy being a lean, mean killing machine. Whether a fleet-footed cheetah or a lie-in-wait puma, a hunting feline’s survival balances on the point between how much energy they lose in hunting for a meal and the energy they gain from actually eating it. Now, two new studies in the journal Science follow these big cats to find out how they make this lifestyle work.

Read the full article here.

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Pumas Trained to Run on Treadmill Help Explain Big Cat’s Ambush Strategy

A nice article in National Geographic on our recent Science paper on puma energetics.

The group, led by Terrie Williams and Chris Wilmers of the University of California, Santa Cruz, spent years working with engineers to develop a novel wildlife tracking collar to measure the energetics, movements and behaviors of animals in the wild. Energetic expenditure is the lifeblood of an animal, says Wilmers. “If they’re burning more calories than they’re consuming they’ll die. And without enough surplus calories, they’ll never reproduce successfully.”

Read the entire article here.

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